Children's System of Care

Welcome to the Monroe County Children's
System of Care website!

Caring for youth is what System of Care is all about. 

Who are "our youth"?  They are children and youth with emotional and behavioral challenges.  They are young people who are not defined by their diagnosis but must learn to function day-to-day despite of it.  They have personal strengths, ideas to share and dreams of achieving great things, like graduating from college, becoming a writer, getting a job, being a good parent, and more.

This page provides information on the core values and beliefs of our System of Care and opportunities for learning through trainings. All trainings are free and open to the public (including youth and their families), and are held at:

1099 Jay Street, Building J
Second Floor – Youth and Family Partnership (YFP) Board Room
Rochester, NY 14611
 


System of Care Values

Dig a little deeper into the core values of Monroe County's  System of Care.

These values weave through everything Monroe County does and aspires to achieve throughout a System of Care in children’s mental health.  
 
System of Care Values

Youth Guided

Young people have the right to be empowered, educated on the issues, and given a decision-making role in the care of their own lives as well as the policies and procedures governing the care of all youth in the community, state, and nation.
 
Instead of viewing youth as simply “recipients of services”, youth are empowered and given support to find their voice and express their ideas and opinions during the service planning process and throughout treatment. Youth, along with their family members, define their goals and determine what “success" means to them.
 

Back to top

Family Driven

Family-driven means families have a primary decision making role in the care of their own children as well as the policies and procedures governing care for all children in their community, state, tribe, territory and nation (source: National Federation of Families for Children's Mental Health - http://www.ffcmh.org/family-driven/)

Monroe County’s System of Care has moved away from the traditional philosophy, which viewed mental health and other service providers as the sole “experts” of a youth’s care, and instead recognizes the inherent value and insights a family member has with regard to what is “right” and “good” for their child and family when developing a service plan. 

It also means that the family, along with the youth, has a voice in defining what “successful” outcomes are for their child and family.
 

Back to top

Trauma Informed

Being trauma-informed means having a basic understanding of how trauma impacts the life of an individual seeking services.  Trauma-informed systems, organizations, programs, and services are based on an understanding of the vulnerabilities or triggers of trauma survivors that traditional service delivery approaches may (unknowingly) aggravate, and seek to improve these services and programs so they can become more supportive and avoid re-traumatization.

It recognizes the need to work in a collaborative way with family, youth, community, friends, and with human services agencies in a manner that will empower consumers.

 

Back to top

Cultural & Linguistic Competence (CLC)

Simply defined as a respect for and acceptance of difference in others. This includes, but is not limited to, respect for and understanding of ethnic, racial, cultural, religious, and other groups, as well as their histories, beliefs, languages, and value systems and having (or building) the capacity to expand on this knowledge and integrate it into all areas – policies, organizational structures, staffing, interventions, financing, and evaluation of results.

 

Where there used to be a “one size fits all” approach to interventions, therapies, and treatments, emphasis is placed on getting to know the youth and the family on a deeper level (building a trusting relationship) and within the context of their environment and their background. 

 

Back to top

Community Based

Defined as having mental health and related services and supports based within the family’s neighborhood and community. This includes services and supports that might be considered “non-traditional” services, such as music lessons at a neighbor’s home as a form of music therapy. Having services and supports in a family’s neighborhood recognizes that families and youth do better when they’re in a familiar environment.

 

Back to top

Best Practice Oriented

Best practices help ensure a high quality of care that not only focuses on better youth and family outcomes but also looks at the process and infrastructure that get us there.  

Being best practice oriented also means being proactive in searching for new and better ways of doing things and sharing those findings with the broader System of Care community, partners, and stakeholders. 

 

Back to top

Supporting learning through education and training

 2016 Community Training Opportunities

 

Functional Behavioral Approach – Overview  - 6 hours (can be split into two 3 hour sessions):

The Functional Behavioral Approach (FBA) is a way to understand and respond to “big behaviors” by focusing specifically on the underlying needs, strengths and skills of youth.

This training is designed to give participants an interactive overview of the FBA process. Key points covered in the training include:

  • The difference between FBA and the more traditional responses to behavior.
  • Understanding how skill development, trauma issues, and unmet needs influence behavior.
  • Teaching tips that facilitate learning new skills and disrupt negative behavior patterns.

Target audience: Youth and family members, education and human service providers, community partners.

 


 

Trauma : An Overview of Emotional Trauma – 3 hours:

This training is designed to give participants an interactive overview of emotional trauma focusing on the impact trauma has on youth, families and community partners. Key points covered in the training include:

  • Identification of potential traumatic events and  trauma symptoms.
  • Brief overview of how trauma can influence brain development, especially in children.
  • Understanding the importance of trauma informed responses to trauma-induced behaviors.

Target audience: Youth and family members, education and human service providers, community partners.

 


 

Self –Awareness – 3 hours:

This training consists of facilitated discussion and interactive activities that highlight the importance of being aware of how our own feelings/thoughts/emotions can influence our interaction with others. Keys points covered in the training:

  • An exploration of where our feelings/emotions come from.
  • Recognition of circumstances when our personal issues might be triggered.
  • Development of strategies to control, change and/or modify our expression of feelings/emotions when they are interfering with our interactions and/or relationships with others.

Target audience: Youth and family members, education and human service providers, community partners.

 


 

General Guidelines for Limit Setting with Youth – 2 hours   (extended version with enhanced activities – 3 hours)

This training is designed to give participants an interactive overview of basic, practical, and effective limiting setting techniques with children and youth, with emphasis on promoting value development.  Key points covered in the training:

  • Understanding how a system of discipline and limit setting can be a key support in teaching basic values to youth.
  • Overview of the key elements to teaching positive behaviors and in using effective, natural, logical and age-appropriate consequences when needed.
  • Review of adult responses to youth behaviors that can both help or hinder the learning process.

Target audience: The training is designed for parents, caregivers, child care workers, teachers and community partners that work directly with youth.

 


 

Diversity, Values, and Decision Making – 2 hours:

This training consists of a highly interactive decision-making activity where participants are asked to collaborate on reaching group consensus without compromising their personal values. Key points covered in the training:

  • Discussion of how our values, beliefs, and feelings might present challenges to decision making.
  • Recognition that the assumptions we make about others can also can lead to decision making barriers.
  • Understanding the complexities of achieving consensus while respecting and appreciating the diverse backgrounds of all participants.

 

Target audience: Youth and family members, education and human service providers, community partners.

 


 

Constructive Feedback – Enhancing  Work Skills  – 90 minutes:

This training is based on the premise that we enhance our work skills by being open to constructive feedback and by providing honest feedback to others. Key points covered in the training:

  • Understanding that offering and accepting feedback, though sometimes uncomfortable, can enhance opportunities for growth.
  • Discussion of the barriers or challenges for providing feedback, and how a culture of honest feedback can positively impact the work environment.
  • Identification of the constructive feedback process and strategies to develop skills.

 

Target audience: Youth and family members, education and human service providers, community partners.

 


 

Engagement Skills – Active Listening – 90 minutes:

This training is designed to give participants a brief overview of the active listening process and the importance of developing listening skills when engaging youth, families, and our colleagues. Key points covered in the training:

  • Understanding how enhancing your listening skills can enhance relationship building.
  • Review of active listening techniques.
  • Recognition of strategies to address barriers to the active listening process.

 

Target audience: Youth and family members, education and human service providers, community partners.

 


 

Principles of Family/Youth Engagement – 6 hours: (can be split into two 3 hour sessions)

This interactive training is designed to give participants an in-depth understanding of basic engagement skills within the context of teaming with youth, families and community partners in a strength-base, needs-focused planning process. Key points covered in the training:

  • Understanding how attention to System of Care values can lead to enhanced relationships with our partners.
  • Review of basic engagement skills that emphasize the use of strengths, active listening, empathy, validation, and respect.
  • Discussion of the challenges to both initial and ongoing engagement.

 

Target audience: Youth and family members, education and human service providers, community partners.

 

To find out more, or to receive e-mail notification of scheduled training opportunities, please contact:       

Brian Conheady, Monroe County System of Care- Community Coach and Trainer

                   Phone: 753-2624 or bconheady@monroecounty.gov

 

  • All trainings above are free to participants
  • Trainings can be brought to your work site as requested, at a date and time convenient for your program (including evenings and weekends).

 


 

Child & Family Team Process Training

The Child and Family Team (CFT) process is a collaborative, team based approach to service and support planning that is family-driven, youth-guided, and strength-based with the emphasis on identifying and addressing the underlying needs that cause behavior. Training participants will learn about the Values and Guiding Principles of the Child and Family Team process, how CFT is different from traditional approaches to challenging behavior, engagement and relationship building skills, and much more. This training is required for Monroe County Care Coordination staff (including Case Management staff) and is open to other professionals, community partners, family members, youth, and others who are interested in learning more about supporting youth with challenging behaviors.

For more information or questions about the Child and Family Team training please contact Brian Conheady, Monroe County System of Care Resource Team at 585-753-2624 or email bconheady@monroecounty.gov.


 

 

  print this page    email this page    back to top

About MonroeCounty.gov · Accessibility and Standards · RSS News Feed
Disclaimer and Privacy Policy · Non-Discrimination Policy

Official Site of Monroe County, New York. Copyright © 2017 Monroe County. All Rights Reserved.
Comments or suggestions? Please e-mail the MonroeCounty.gov webmaster.

View Training Schedules & Register

Click here to register for trainings!

Child and Family Team (CFT)
Functional Behavioral Approach (FBA)